Only one year has passed since Raveena released her debut EP Shanti, yet the rising singer-songwriter has already assembled a rich visual language to go with her smooth R&B sound that casts a subversive sheen on her Indian heritage. See last year’s “Temptation,” in which Raveena, clad in a green silk dressing gown, reclines on a crimson and pink paisley daybed, of the kind one might find in a ’70s Bollywood film. As she starts to embrace the titular “Miss Temptation,” however, surrounded by lush jungle palms, it’s clear that she’s flipping the script on the typical Bollywood romance. In “Honey,” Raveena, dressed in a pearl-encrusted headpiece with layer upon layer of traditional gold Indian jewelry wrapped around her neck, lets viscous beads of honey slowly drip down her face while queer couples kiss in the background.

Raveena is already fitting her sexual fluidity into direct conversation with her Indian heritage, but her new video for “Mama,” which Raveena released just in time for Mother’s Day, brings her family and their early immigrant history even more into the mix. It shows Raveena, her mother, and her grandmother on location in Queens, where her parents and grandparents first moved to from the Punjab region of India in the late 1980s (and where Raveena herself partly grew up).

There’s a clip of an old home video of her mother smiling in an ornate printed red sari with a gilded lining and matching gold jewelry. It then cuts quickly to present-day Raveena wearing a contemporary version of that outfit. From those first frames, “Mama” functions as a bridge that connects her mother’s past to Raveena’s present. “Obviously it’s a song about my mom and my relationship with her, but I kind of wanted to look more deeply into the unique relationship we have as a first-generation immigrant,” Raveena says. “My own family comes from a lot of trauma—genocide in India—and they then came to Queens, so it was kind of telling her story. I was just writing the song wondering who she was before all of that happened, before she had me. What were her biggest dreams?”

The video, which director Danica Kleinknecht shot in Queens, combines true-to-life details with Raveena’s speculations about her mother’s aspirations. The team filmed on a street close to where her mother lived when she first immigrated in the late ’80s after the 1984 Sikh Massacre; the church that Raveena, her mother, and her grandmother all walk through is the very church where Raveena’s parents got married. Everyone featured is either a first- or second-generation immigrant friend of Raveena’s from New York, or a fan who had reached out to Raveena, who in turn asked them to be a part of the video. “We just wanted to capture real family moments. It’s not meant to be anything bigger. There’s no crazy concept we were going for,” Raveena says.

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Additional scenes of Raveena and her mother looking through gauzy textiles in the fabric store were also plucked from real life—Raveena’s mother is a fashion designer who worked with Calvin Klein in the ’90s and still creates custom couture pieces. She collaborates with Raveena on the colorful garments seen in her videos and onstage. “It’s a big part of our relationship, working together on clothes for my music now,” Raveena says. “She had such a big influence on my style growing up, and now I can come to her with anything, with really modern or new designers, or with this crazy ’70s Cher mood board that I just made, and we see how we can translate it all into a way that feels relevant to what I do. She has a really elegant concept with everything that she makes.”

Photo: Courtesy of Raveena Music / Manorama Music

Raveena’s videos are usually much more stylized, she says, but with “Mama,” she wanted to keep everything as natural as possible. There are sweet moments of Raveena dancing with her grandmother, who is wearing a more traditional pale pink sari, while Raveena is wearing a bright, tiered floral print dress. “You definitely see a lot of my everyday style in the video,” Raveena says, which is very much influenced by the relaxed silhouettes and psychedelic color palette of the ’70s. “I only wear colors. I don’t own anything black or blue or gray. I pretty much only wear pinks and yellows and oranges.” Though Raveena draws inspiration from designers like Collina Strada and Eckhaus Latta, she traces this love of color to her South Asian background. “There’s just so much color in everything in India: the most gorgeous blues and pinks and yellows and every color of the rainbow that you could imagine,” she says.

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In other words, Raveena is wholly informed by her roots, as passed beautifully down by her mother and grandmother. “Especially because we were shooting in locations from when they first came over, everything you see in the video is real life, real moments. I was definitely very emotional during it. I felt connected to them in a new way,” she says.